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 Anaphylaxis Management Policy

February 2014

This policy applies when a student diagnosed as being at risk of anaphylaxis by a qualified medical prac-titioner is enrolled at PCW Melbourne.

ANAPHYLAXIS

Anaphylaxis is a severe, rapidly progressive allergic reaction that is potentially life threatening. The most common allergens in school aged children are peanuts, eggs, tree nuts (eg cashews, almonds, walnuts, pista-chios and pine nuts), cow’s milk, fish and shellfish, wheat, soy, sesame seeds, latex, certain insect stings, par-ticularly bee stings, and some medications.

Signs and Symptoms:

* Swelling of the lips, face and eyes

* Hives or welts

* Tingling mouth

* Abdominal pain and/or vomiting (these are signs of a severe allergic reaction to insects)

* Difficult/noisy breathing

* Swelling of the tongue

* Swelling/tightness in throat

* Difficulty talking and/or hoarse voice

* Wheeze or persistent cough

* Persistent dizziness or collapse

* Pale and floppy (younger children)

 

Adrenaline given through an Epi-Pen autoinjector to the muscle of the outer mid thigh is the most effective first aid treatment for anaphylaxis.

PURPOSE OF POLICY

* To provide, as far as practicable, a safe and supportive environment in which students at risk of anaphy-laxis can participate equally in all aspects of the student’s schooling.

* To raise awareness about anaphylaxis and the school’s anaphylaxis management policy in the school community.

* To engage with parents/carers of students at risk of anaphylaxis in assessing risks, developing risk mini-misation strategies and management strategies for the student.

* To ensure that each staff member has adequate knowledge and training pertaining to allergies, ana-phylaxis and the school’s policy and procedures in responding to an anaphylactic reaction.

 

 

INDIVIDUAL ANAPHYLAXIS MANAGEMENT PLANS

A partnership will be established between PCW Melbourne and the parents/carers of students diagnosed by a qualified medical practitioner as being at risk of anaphylaxis. The College will ensure that, in consultation with parents/carers, an individual management plan is developed for these students. The individual anaphylaxis man-agement plan will be in place as soon as practicable after the student enrols, and where possible before their first day of school.

The individual anaphylaxis management plan will set out the following:

* Information about the diagnosis, including the type of allergy or allergies the student has (based on a diag-nosis from a medical practitioner).

* Strategies to minimise the risk of exposure to allergens while the student is under the care or supervision of school staff, for in-school and out of school settings, including camps and excursions.

* The name of the person/s responsible for implementing the strategies.

* Information on where the student’s medication will be stored.

* The student’s emergency contact details.

* An emergency procedures plan (ASCIA Action Plan), provided by the parent, that:

 

sets out the emergency procedures to be taken in the event of an allergic reaction;

is signed by a medical practitioner who was treating the child on the date the practitioner signs the emer-gency procedures plan; and

includes an up to date photograph of the student.

 

The student’s individual management plan will be reviewed, in consultation with the student’s parents/carers:

* annually, and as applicable,

* if the student’s condition changes, or

* immediately after a student has an anaphylactic reaction at school.

 

It is the responsibility of the parent to:

* provide the emergency procedures plan (ASCIA Action Plan).

* inform the college if their child’s medical condition changes, and if relevant, provide an updated emergency procedures plan (ASCIA Action Plan).

* Provide an epi-pen and replace when the use-by date has expired.

 

 

COMMUNICATION PLAN

The College will be responsible for ensuring that a communication plan is developed to provide information to all staff, students and parents about anaphylaxis and the school’s anaphylaxis management policy.

The communication plan will include information about what steps will be taken to respond to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in a classroom, in the school yard, on school excursions, on school camps and special event days

Volunteers and casual relief staff will be informed of students at risk of anaphylaxis and their role in responding to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in their care by the deputy principal.

All staff will be briefed once each semester by a staff member who has up to date anaphylaxis management training on:

* PCW Melbourne’s anaphylaxis management policy

* The causes, symptoms and treatment of anaphylaxis

* The identities of students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis and where their medication is located

* How to use an epi-pen

 

The School’s first aid and emergency response procedures.

STAFF TRAINING AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Teachers and other school staff who conduct classes in which students at risk of anaphylaxis attend or come un-der supervision of, must have up to date training in an anaphylaxis management training course.

At other times while the student is under the care or supervision of the School, including excursions, yard duty, camps and special event days, the principal must ensure that there is a sufficient number of staff present who have up to date training in an anaphylaxis management training course.

The principal will identify the school staff to be trained based on a risk assessment.

Training will be provided to these staff as soon as practicable after the student enrols.

Wherever possible, training will take place before the student’s first day at school. Where this is not possible, an interim plan will be developed in consultation with the parents.

The school’s first aid procedures and the student’s emergency procedures plan (ASCIA Action Plan) will be fol-lowed in responding to an anaphylactic reaction.

 

RESPONSE TO EMERGENCY AND COMMUNICATION PLAN

FOR FIRST TIME REACTIONS – CALL 000.

If a student has a severe allergic reaction, but has not been previously diagnosed with an allergy or as being at risk of anaphylaxis, an ambulance should be called immediately. Follow any instructions given by emergency ser-vices (which may include administering the epi-pen marked for general use), as well as the school’s normal first aid emergency procedures.

FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE BEEN MEDICALLY DIAGNOSED AS BEING AT RISK OF ANAPHYLAXIS

If a student is experiencing an anaphylactic reaction in class or the school yard:

Where the student has her epi-pen with her:

* The teacher (or teacher on supervision duty) is expected to administer the epi-pen that the student has with her.

* The teacher remains with the student at all times and endeavours to keep her as calm as possible and reas-sure her that assistance is coming. Once a student has received the adrenaline, it is important that they remain lying down with feet elevated where possible. Student must not be made to stand or walk.

* The teacher on supervision duty sends for assistance from First Aid Officer via another student. The First Aid Officer will immediately call Reception Staff and ask them to call an ambulance, stating that the student is having an anaphylactic reaction. The First Aid Officer will then immediately proceed to the classroom or schoolyard where the student is located to assist in reassurance.

* Reception staff will arrange for students to wait at front entrance and guide ambulance officers to location of the patient.

 

Parents are called and advised of the situation.

Where the student does not have her epi-pen with her:

* The teacher (or teacher on supervision duty) sends for the First Aid Officer, via another student, stating that the student’s epi-pen is required. The teacher stays with the patient at all times and endeavours to keep her as calm as possible and reassure her that assistance is coming.

* The First Aid Officer immediately proceeds to where the student is located and administers the epi-pen. Once a student has received the adrenaline, it is important that they remain lying down with feet elevated where possible. Student must not be made to stand or walk.

* The teacher calls Reception Staff and asks them to call an ambulance, stating that the student is having an anaphylactic reaction.

* Reception staff will arrange for students to wait at front entrance and guide ambulance officers to location of the patient.

* Parents are called and advised of the situation.

* If parents have not arrived by the time the ambulance needs to depart, the First Aid Officer or other staff member will accompany the student to the hospital.

 

 

If a student is experiencing an anaphylactic reaction outside school campus, on excursions or school camps:

* The epi-pen is taken personally by the classroom teacher to the activity. A mobile telephone must be taken to any off school campus activities.

* In the event of an anaphylactic episode during the activity, the epi-pen should be administered to the student by a teacher from PCW Melbourne.

* The teacher will contact the ambulance service.

* When ambulance has arrived PCW Melbourne front office is contacted.

* Front Office staff will inform Principal (or delegate) of the situation.

 

Parents are contacted and advised of the situation.

 

APPENDIX – ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Role and responsibilities of all school staff

School staff have a duty to take reasonable steps to protect a student under their care from

risks of injury that are reasonably foreseeable. This includes administrators, canteen staff,

casual relief staff, specialist staff and volunteers. Staff are required to

do the following:

 

1. Know and understand the School Anaphylaxis Management Policy.

2. Know the identity of students who are at risk of anaphylaxis.

3. Understand the causes, symptoms, and treatment of anaphylaxis.

4. Obtain regular training in how to recognise and respond to an anaphylactic reaction, including administer-ing an adrenaline autoinjector (epi-pen).

5. Keep a copy of each student’s ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis, or know where to find one quickly, and follow it in the event of an allergic reaction.

6. Know the School’s first aid emergency procedures and their role in relation to responding to an anaphylac-tic reaction.

7. Know where students’ epi-pens are kept. (Remember that the epi-pen is designed so that anyone can ad-minister it in an emergency.)

8. Know and follow the prevention and risk minimisation strategies in the student’s

Anaphylaxis Management Plan.

9. Plan ahead for special class activities (e.g. cooking, art and science classes), or special occasions (e.g. excur-sions, incursions, sport days, camp, cultural days, fetes and parties). Work with parents/carers to provide ap-propriate food for their child if the food the school/class is providing may present a risk for him or her.

10. Avoid the use of food treats in class or as rewards, as these may contain hidden

allergens.

11. Be aware of the possibility of hidden allergens in foods and of traces of allergens when using items such as egg or milk cartons in art or cooking classes.

12. Be aware of the risk of cross-contamination when preparing, handling and displaying food.

13. Make sure that tables and surfaces are wiped down regularly and that students wash their hands after handling food.

14. Raise student awareness about severe allergies and the importance of their role in fostering a school envi-ronment that is safe and supportive for their peers.

 

Role and responsibilities of First Aid Officer

The First Aid Officer should take a lead role in supporting principals and

teachers to implement prevention and management strategies for the school.

This officer is required to do the following.

 

1. Work with principal to develop, implement and review the School’s Anaphylaxis

Management Policy and every student’s Anaphylaxis Management Plan.

2. Obtain regular training in how to recognise and respond to an anaphylactic reaction, including administering an epi-pen.

3. Provide or arrange regular training to other staff members to recognise and respond to anaphylactic reactions.

4. Keep an up-to-date register of students at risk of anaphylaxis.

5. Regularly review the individual Anaphylaxis Management Plans to:

• Ensure that students’ emergency contact details are up-to-date

• Ensure that the device-specific Action Plan for Anaphylaxis matches the supplied

autoinjector

• check that the epi-pen is not out-of-date, such as at the beginning or

end of each term. For those students with an epi-pen, check the adrenaline is not

cloudy through the epi-pen window

• inform parents/carers in writing a month prior to the expiry date if the

epi-pen needs to be replaced. Ensure that epi-pens are

stored correctly (at room temperature and away from light) in an unlocked, easily

accessible place, and that this storage area is appropriately labelled.

6. Work with staff to conduct regular risk prevention, minimisation, assessment and

management strategies.

7. Work with staff to develop strategies to raise school staff, student and community

awareness about severe allergies.

8. Provide or arrange post-incident support (e.g. counselling) to students and staff, if appropriate.

 

Role and responsibilities of parents/carers of a student at risk of anaphylaxis

 

1. Inform the school, either at enrolment or diagnosis, of the student’s allergies, and whether the student has been diagnosed as being at risk of anaphylaxis.

2. Obtain an ASCIA Action Plan for Anaphylaxis from the student’s medical practitioner that details their condition and any medications to be administered,and provide this to the school.

3. Meet/Discuss with the school to develop the student’s Anaphylaxis Management Plan.

4. Provide the adrenaline autoinjector and any other medications to the school.

5. Replace the adrenaline autoinjector and any other medication before their expiry date.

6. Assist school staff in planning and preparation for the student prior to school camps, field trips, incur-sions, excursions or special events (e.g. class parties, cultural days, fetes or sport days). Supply alternative food options for the student when needed.

7. Inform staff of any changes to the student’s emergency contact details.

8. Participate in reviews of the student’s Anaphylaxis Management Plan:

9. when there is a change to the student’s condition

10. immediately after the student has an anaphylactic reaction at school

11. at its annual review.